dacron

Dacron -trademark for a polyester fiber. Dacron is a condensation polymer obtained from ethylene glycol and terephthalic acid. Its properties include high tensile strength, high resistance to stretching, both wet and dry, and good resistance to degradation by chemical bleaches and to abrasion. The continuous filament yarn is used in curtains, dress fabrics, high-pressure fire hoses, men's shirts, and thread. The staple fiber is ideal for mixing with wool in men's and women's suits, as well as in dress fabrics, knitted wear, and washable woven sportswear.

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Polyester - PET

British chemists, John Rex Whinfield and James Tennant Dickson, employees of the Calico Printer's Association of Manchester, patented "polyethylene terephthalate" (also called PET or PETE) in 1941, after advancing the early research of Wallace Carothers. The saw that Carothers's research had not investigated the polyester formed from ethylene glycol and terephthalic acid. Polyethylene terephthalate is the basis of synthetic fibers such as polyester, dacron, and terylene. Whinfield and Dickson along with inventors W.K. Birtwhistle and C.G. Ritchiethey also created the first polyester fiber called Terylene in 1941 (first manufactured by Imperial Chemical Industries or ICI). The second polyester fiber was Dupont's Dacron.


According to Dupont, "In the late 1920s, DuPont was in direct competition with Britain’s recently formed Imperial Chemical Industries. DuPont and ICI agreed in October 1929 to share information about patents and research developments. In 1952, the companies’ alliance was dissolved... The polymer that became polyester has roots in the 1929 writings of Wallace Carothers. However, DuPont chose to concentrate on the more promising nylon research. When DuPont resumed its polyester research, ICI had patented Terylene polyester, to which DuPont purchased the U.S. rights in 1945 for further development. In 1950, a pilot plant at the Seaford, Delaware, facility produced Dacron [polyester] fiber with modified nylon technology.


Dupont's polyester research lead to a whole range of trademarked products, one example is Mylar (1952), an extraordinarily strong polyester (PET) film that grew out of the development of Dacron in the early 1950s.
Polyesters are made from chemical substances found mainly in petroluem and are manufactured in fibers, films, and plastics.
According to Dupont Teijin Films, "Plain polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyester is most commonly associated with a material from which cloth and high-performance clothing are produced (e.g., DuPont Dacron® polyester fiber). Increasingly over the last ten years PET has gained acceptance as a material of choice for beverage bottles... PETG, also known as glycolised polyester, is used in the production of cards... Polyester film (PETF) is a semi-crystalline film used in many applications such as videotape, high quality packaging, professional photographic printing, X-ray film, floppy disks, etc. " source Comparison of PETF, PETG and PET
DuPont Teijin Films (founded January 1, 2000) is a leading supplier of PET and PEN polyester films whose brand names incude: Mylar ®, Melinex ®, and Teijin ® Tetoron ® PET polyester film, Teonex ® PEN polyester film, and Cronar ® polyester photographic base film.
Naming an invention actually involves developing at least two names. One name is the generic name. The other name is the brand name or trademark. For example, Mylar ® and Teijin ® are brand names; polyester film or polyethylene terephthalate are the generic or product names.

inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blpolyester.htm


Dacron

A Dacron graft is a synthetic (manmade) material used to replace normal body tissues. It is usually made in tubular form to replace or repair blood vessels. The graft causes very few reactions because it is chemically harmless and easily tolerated by the body. When used in blood vessels, the body eventually grows a new lining to the graft that mimics normal blood vessel linings.
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www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002345.htm
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